13 Different Woodpeckers in Wyoming

Woodpeckers in Wyoming
Photo by Timothy Kindrachuk

Woodpeckers are a common sight in Wyoming. The state is home to many different woodpeckers in Wyoming, including the long-billed sapsucker and the rufous woodpecker.

They can be seen at parks and nature preserves throughout the region as well as in suburban areas where they’re attracted by insect-rich trees such as oak trees and willows.

1. Downy Woodpecker

The downy woodpecker is a medium-sized bird with a black body, white throat, red eyes, and feet. It has gray sides to its body with black bars on each side of the neck and head that cover almost all of the upper part of the body except for some feathers near the top of its back (these are usually missing in birds seen during winter months).

The bill is yellowish-white with thin edges at both ends. This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming can be found throughout Wyoming but is more abundant in southern areas than in northern ones.

The downy woodpecker is a medium-sized bird with a black body, white throat, red eyes, and feet. It has gray sides to its body with black bars on each side of the neck and head that cover almost all of the upper part of the body except for some feathers near the top of its back (these are usually missing in birds seen during winter months).

The bill is yellowish-white with thin edges at both ends. This species can be found throughout Wyoming but is

2. Red-bellied Woodpecker

The Red-bellied Woodpecker is a small bird, measuring just under four inches long. It has red feathers on its head and back, which help identify it from other woodpeckers.

This list of woodpeckers in the Wyoming diet consists of insects and small rodents such as mice, rats, squirrels, and chipmunks.

The Red-bellied Woodpecker lives in forested areas with trees that have enough space to build their nests on branches high up in the trees (usually 25 feet or higher).

They also like areas with dead trees where they can find sap running down inside them (this is where they get their name).

The life cycle for this species lasts about three years: the mating season begins in January; eggs hatch within a few weeks after mating; young fledge at around ten weeks old; juveniles begin hunting soon after that, while adults continue. Nesting until next summer’s breeding season starts again!

3. Ladder-backed Woodpecker

The Ladder-backed Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) is a small bird with black and white plumage, a long hooked bill, and the ability to climb trees.

This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming can be found in open areas of Wyoming, including grasslands, shrubland, and forests with scattered trees.

Their diet consists mainly of insects, but they will also eat berries during winter when they’ve frozen off their food source and fruit from shrubs or vines growing on trees such as willows or apple trees. 

They also eat seeds from plants like grasses but prefer those that are easier to digest since most birds don’t like eating things like seeds because they’re hard work digesting!

You’ll need some kindling wood handy, so you can start feeding them some crickets or mealworms once they arrive in your yard; just make sure there’s enough room under each tree so you don’t get damaged by falling branches while trying desperately not to lose yourself trying chase after these little critters!

4. Lewis’s Woodpecker

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a small woodpecker with a large, straight bill and a red crown. It has enormous eyes, which give it an appearance similar to that of a crow or magpie.

The male has a dark red crown and nape, white cheeks, and a white line that runs from the bill to the neck. The female has only one red stripe on each side of her head; she also lacks any spots on her breast (although there may be some faint ones).

This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming can be found in woodlands, streamsides, and parks. It usually forages insects on dead trees or buildings, and its diet is mainly made up of ants and beetles, although it eats fruit when available.

Lewis’s Woodpecker is a common bird in the West and Southwest, but it is not as common in the East. Lewis’s Woodpecker can be found throughout Wyoming during most of the year. In summer, it can be heard drumming on wood with its bill to attract a mate.

5. Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker is a small black and white woodpecker found in Wyoming. It’s one of the most common species in the state, with an estimated population of around 100-200 birds.

This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming has a wingspan of about 12 inches (30 centimeters) and weighs about 1 ounce (28 grams). 

Its tail feathers are often longer than those on its body; this helps it hold its balance while flying from tree to tree or perching on power lines or other structures high above ground level.

The Hairy Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker often mistaken for its more common cousin, the Downy Woodpecker. The Hairy Woodpecker is a small black and white woodpecker found in Wyoming. 

It’s one of the most common species in the state, with an estimated population of around 100-200 birds.

The difference between this bird and other members of its family is that they have longer tail feathers than those on its body; this helps it hold its balance while flying from tree to tree or perching on power lines or other structures high above ground level.

6. White-headed Woodpecker

The White-headed Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in the eastern United States. It is the only member of its genus, but it has been known to hybridize with other species.

This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming prefers deciduous forests and clearings, where it forages for insects that live in dead trees or under the bark.

The males are mostly black on top and white underneath, with a red patch on the back of the head. The females have a brownish-red patch on their neck that extends upwards towards the beak.

White-headed Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in the eastern United States. It is the only member of its genus, but it has been known to hybridize with other species.

The White-headed Woodpecker prefers deciduous forests and clearings, where it forages for insects that live in dead trees or under the bark.

7. Williamson’s Sapsucker

Williamson’s Sapsucker is a small, black and white bird with a long tail. It has olive-colored eyes and dark brown spots on its head. It lives in coniferous forests across the Northern Rocky Mountains, including Wyoming. 

It feeds on insects hidden among bark or under logs or rocks near streams where they can find their prey while drinking water from these sources. The male has distinctive white throat feathers and gives him his name—Williamson’s Sapsucker! 

8. Red-Naped Woodpecker 

The red-naped woodpecker is one of the most common woodpeckers in Wyoming. It is a small to medium-sized bird with a black back, white belly, and redhead. The male has a red nape (back of the neck), while the female has a brown nape.

Both sexes have a white bar on the wing. This woodpecker can be found in the state’s open woods, edges, and forest clearings. They nest mainly in trees but occasionally use utility poles or other man-made structures for nesting.

Red-Naped Woodpeckers eat insects, grubs, fruit, and seeds. They feed primarily on insects and other invertebrates. They are usually seen singly or in pairs during the summer but often form large flocks in winter that may include hundreds of birds.

These flocks roost at night and feed together during the day, when they can be seen drumming loudly on trees as they search for food.

9. American Three-Toed Woodpecker

The American Three-Toed Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker with grayish head and neck feathers, black body feathers, and red eyes.

It has rufous wings that give it its name. They have three toes on their hind feet and two toes on the front of the foot. Their diet consists of insects, berries, and seeds; they also eat some small mammals, such as mice or voles, when food is scarce.

This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming, their breeding season usually runs from May through August, with young fledging in June or July; females lay two eggs per season, which hatch after about 40 days!

American Three Toe Woodpeckers build nests high up in trees where they will sit upright, looking out over open areas below them so they can spot prey moving through grasslands below them.

At the same time, they eat their meal before flying off again toward another tree with more food nearby!

10. Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker

The Yellow-bellied sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker, with males measuring around 10 inches long and weighing up to 2.5 ounces.

Like many other birds in the family Picidae (woodpeckers), yellow-bellied sapsuckers have stout bills for drilling into trees for insects and spiders—hence their name!

Yellow-bellied sapsuckers are common throughout eastern North America, including much of Canada and parts of Mexico, and states like New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio.

They can be found on tree trunks when they’re active during the summer, but they tend to prefer wetland habitats when winter gets drier.

This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming is standard throughout eastern North America, including much of Canada and parts of Mexico, as well as states like New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio.

They can be found on tree trunks when they’re active during the summer, but they tend to prefer wetland habitats when winter gets drier.

11. Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a small bird found in the northwestern part of North America. It has been known to be confused with other woodpeckers, but it can be distinguished by its bright yellow and red coloration on its head, back, and wings.

This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming is a migratory species that winters in Central America, where it eats insects such as ants and beetles.

In springtime, they migrate northward to breed along river bottoms near forests or lakes; once there, they will mate for life until one dies from old age or predation by other birds (such as hawks).

12. Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated woodpeckers are large birds that resemble crows but are part of the same family. They have a red crest and a black back.

Pileated woodpeckers live in the eastern United States, especially around the southeastern corner of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware (where you might see one at your local park).

This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming has a large bill with two large holes on each side: one for catching insects while another is used to peck at trees.

The pileated used its strong beak to dig into tree trunks or holes to get at food items located deep within crevices within their bark (like ants). Pileated woodpeckers usually feed on ants, like seeds and some fruits.

You can find this species by looking for a large round hole in tree trunks. The pileated woodpecker will use its beak to peck out pieces of bark until it has made a small opening, which it then uses as an entrance into the tree trunk.

Pileated woodpeckers nest in hollow trees or cavities created by other animals. If you see one near your house, you can tell if there are any pileated woodpeckers living inside by looking

13. Black-backed Woodpecker

The black-backed woodpecker is a medium-sized bird with a black back and white belly. It lives in forests, woodland areas, and grasslands.

This bird is common in Wyoming, where it can be found along the base of trees or on fenceposts or utility poles. 

Black-backed woodpeckers eat insects and larvae that they find under the bark or branches of trees (especially cedar) and fruit from other plants such as berries or nuts from nearby shrubs.

This list of woodpeckers in Wyoming is protected by law because they’re considered endangered; therefore, no one may take them without permission from the Department of Fish & Wildlife!

The black-backed woodpecker is a medium-sized bird with a black back and white belly. It lives in forests, woodland areas, and grasslands.

This bird is common in Wyoming, where it can be found along the base of trees or on fenceposts or utility poles. Black-backed woodpeckers eat insects and larvae that they find under the bark or branches of trees (especially cedar) and fruit from other plants such as berries or nuts nearby.

Conclusion

Woodpeckers are fun to watch and a great way to get out into the great outdoors. Here, we’ve compiled a list of woodpeckers in Wyoming so you can keep up with this fascinating species! There are many different types of woodpeckers in Wyoming, each with unique characteristics.

Some more common woodpeckers include the downy woodpecker, the hairy woodpecker, and the red-bellied woodpecker. Woodpeckers are important to the ecosystem because they help control insect populations.

They also play a role in dispersing seeds and aiding in the growth of new plants. If you’re lucky enough to spot a woodpecker in Wyoming, take a moment to appreciate these amazing creatures.

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